TRODELVY® (sacituzumab govitecan-hziy) is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with triple-negative breast cancer (negative for estrogen and progesterone hormone receptors and HER2) that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery, and who have received two or more prior treatments, including at least one treatment for metastatic disease.

It is not known if TRODELVY is safe and effective in people with moderate or severe liver problems or in children.
Two women are enjoying a spa day at home. They have towels wrapped around their heads and are placing cucumber slices over their eyes. Not actual patients, but actual stories.

Discover if her path can help guide your plan

Deltra, a woman taking TRODELVY, sat down for an interview to share her experience through an initial diagnosis of metastatic TNBC and the importance of developing a treatment plan. Deltra’s insights can be a useful resource in developing your own plan.

Deltra’s story is only one woman’s story. It will not be the same as your story. Her story is informative and meant to be representative of the experiences and choices that you may face on your own path. Talk with your healthcare provider and your family to determine what choices may be best for you.

TRODELVY talks: A Q&A with Deltra, diagnosed with mTNBC at 38.
Q: What advice do you have for those who just received their diagnosis?
A:

Having a plan is important. I’ve never felt like I was a person who needed control. I’m not a stick to the schedule kind of person, but you can’t feel any more out of control than you do with cancer. Once you have a plan, it may be easier to handle some of your anxiety.

Q: How did your healthcare provider bring up TRODELVY as an option for treatment?
A:

For all my treatments, my oncologist will bring up the name, saying she thinks this is what we should do next. She gives me an actual printout of the information, so I can go and read it myself. I appreciate this because I like to have something in front of me. That way, I can avoid getting lost on the internet finding answers that might scare me.

Q: How do you manage the nervousness that can come with starting a different treatment?
A:

I usually just ask everyone to send me good vibes as I go in. I bring my headphones and a guided meditation. I have one that’s specifically for cancer treatment. It helps me visualize the treatment coming in like it’s a light, helping to fight my cancer.

Q: What would you say to someone who is about to start TRODELVY?
A:

It can be scary starting a different treatment, but it’s also exciting. Everyone has their own story. Even if you have the exact same diagnosis as someone else, your story is your own. I went into my treatment with TRODELVY feeling like this might be the next thing that’s going to help me get from point A to point B (whatever those points may be). So, as much as there is some anxiety with starting any treatment, there’s a lot of hope and excitement to be had.

Q: Are there any online communities that have helped you prepare for treatment?
A:

My breast surgeon and her team recommended a group to me that really helped to distract me. People in that group don’t share posts related to anxiety surrounding cancer or what’s happening with their treatment. It’s basically a breast cancer-focused group that posts memes and happy things.

Q: Do you plan for things other than just the clinical stuff?
A:

Oh yes, definitely. Treatment helps me in my life, but I have to do the actual living. I really enjoy traveling, so whenever I can, I love to go on trips.

A diagnosis of mTNBC comes with a lot of questions. It’s okay; you aren’t alone in this journey. As you move forward, remember that you are an important part of your healthcare team. Deltra’s answers are here to serve as a guide, not instructions.

What is TRODELVY?

TRODELVY® (sacituzumab govitecan-hziy) is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with triple-negative breast cancer (negative for estrogen and progesterone hormone receptors and HER2) that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery, and who have received two or more prior treatments, including at least one treatment for metastatic disease.

It is not known if TRODELVY is safe and effective in people with moderate or severe liver problems or in children.

Important Safety Information

TRODELVY can cause serious side effects, including low white blood cell count and diarrhea:
  • Low white blood cell count (neutropenia) which is common and can sometimes be severe and lead to infections that can be life-threatening or cause death. Your healthcare provider should check your blood cell counts during treatment. If your white blood cell count is too low, your healthcare provider may need to lower your dose, give you a medicine to help prevent low blood cell count with future doses of TRODELVY, or in some cases may stop TRODELVY. Your healthcare provider may need to give you antibiotic medicines if you develop fever while your white blood cell count is low. Call your healthcare provider right away if you develop any of the following signs of infection: fever, chills, cough, shortness of breath, or burning or pain when you urinate.
  • Severe diarrhea. Diarrhea is common and can be severe. Your healthcare provider should monitor you for diarrhea and give you medicine as needed to help control it. If you lose too much body fluid (dehydration), your healthcare provider may need to give you fluids and electrolytes to replace body salts. If diarrhea happens later in your treatment, your healthcare provider may check you to see if it may be caused by an infection. Your healthcare provider may decrease your dose or stop TRODELVY if your diarrhea is severe and cannot be controlled with anti-diarrheal medicines.
    • Call your healthcare provider right away the first time that you get diarrhea during treatment with TRODELVY; if you have black or bloody stools; if you have symptoms of dehydration, such as lightheadedness, dizziness, or faintness; if you are unable to take fluids by mouth due to nausea or vomiting; or if you are not able to get your diarrhea under control within 24 hours.

Do not receive TRODELVY if you have had a severe allergic reaction to TRODELVY. Ask your healthcare provider if you are not sure.

Allergic and infusion-related reactions which can be serious and life-threatening. Tell your healthcare provider or nurse right away if you get any of the following symptoms during your infusion of TRODELVY or within 24 hours after: swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat; hives; skin rash, itching, or flushing of your skin; fever; difficulty breathing or wheezing; lightheadedness, dizziness, feeling faint, or pass out; or chills or shaking chills (rigors).

Nausea and vomiting are common with TRODELVY and can sometimes be severe. Before each dose of TRODELVY, you will receive medicines to help prevent nausea and vomiting along with medicines to take home with instructions about how to take them. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have nausea or vomiting that is not controlled with the medicines prescribed for you. Your healthcare provider may decide to decrease your dose or stop TRODELVY if your nausea and vomiting is severe and cannot be controlled with anti-nausea medicines.

Before receiving TRODELVY, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • have been told that you carry a gene for UGT1A1*28, which can increase your risk of getting side effects with TRODELVY, especially low white blood cell counts, with or without a fever, and low red blood cell counts.
  • have liver problems.
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. TRODELVY can harm your unborn baby. Your healthcare provider should check to see if you are pregnant before you start receiving TRODELVY. TRODELVY may cause fertility problems in females, which could affect your ability to have a baby. Talk to your healthcare provider if fertility is a concern for you.
    • Females who can become pregnant should use effective birth control during treatment and for 6 months after your last dose of TRODELVY. Talk to your healthcare provider about birth control choices that may be right for you during this time.
    • Males with a female partner who can become pregnant should use effective birth control during treatment and for 3 months after your last dose of TRODELVY.
    • Tell your healthcare provider right away if you or your partner become pregnant during treatment with TRODELVY.
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if TRODELVY passes into your breastmilk and can harm your baby. Do not breastfeed during treatment and for 1 month after your last dose of TRODELVY.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Certain medicines may affect the way TRODELVY works.

The most common side effects of TRODELVY include feeling tired or weak, hair loss, decreased red blood cell count, constipation, decreased appetite, rash, and stomach-area (abdominal) pain or discomfort.

These are not all of the possible side effects of TRODELVY. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please click to see Important Facts about TRODELVY, including Important Warning.